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20121001
20121031
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
, ladies and gentlemen, i stood in this very spot a year ago for hurricane irene. there were some similar dire warnings then, and when the storm came, it actually leapfrogged over new york city and landed further up the hudson river and caused considerable damage there, although we didn't know it as the storm was happening and one of the things i've learned in 40 years of coverage these events is that it is always worse than it initially seems because you begin to tally the damage once daylight comes and once things get more calm. but this will not be like a traditional hurricane, this will not be something that happens in six or eight hours and then we're on with our lives and this is an enduring event, it is the collision of the three big weather systems, the tropical hurricanes, the frigid winds coming down from the north and that western low pressure system, everything's going to get churned around and it's going to be part of our lives, unfortunately, for several days, and i think, i fear that before this is over, it's going to be a story with many, many tragic ramifications. but sta
, former dnc chair and vermont governor howard dean is facing off against ed conard. irene rosenfeld, the ceo of mondolez international. the markets aren't to be forgotten. at 8:30 eastern time, we will be joined by jim grant. we're going to talk about the best investing strategies for the rest of the year with him. first, let's get you up to speed on this morning's headlines. over to andrew. >>> friday we'll get the government september jobs report. could be a game changer for the election. we'll get a hint of what may be to come. the employment report coming at 8:15 eastern time. poll forecasters say the economy likely added 155,000 private payroll jobs this month. we'll bring you the number and get you instant reaction from joel prakken. in corporate news, richard schultz is pressing forward with a possible $11 billion buyout of the retailer. schultz and at least four private equity firms have reportedly started examining the books of the economy. at the same time, he is said to be negotiating individually with the pe firms on the details of how his roughly 20% stake in the compan
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
nervous. >> you think it's going to be bad? >> i think so. >> i'm worried. we lucked out with irene, and i don't know. this may be worse. >> nbc's tom strong traung is l rehoboth beach, delaware. any residents left? >> they have about eight hours, the governor issues a mandatory evacuation area. everybody must be out by 8:00. look down the beach, have you several dozen people trying to get their last glimpse. right now, low tide. looks pretty impressive. come high tide, around 6:30, it wouldn't be a surprise if we didn't see water coming up to this fence here. all around rehoboth beach, a lot of businesses boarded up. people making runs to the grocery store, water short, bread is short. people did what they could in terms of preparation. they had about eight hours, around that time, this area will be shut down. cut off the bridges and roads into here it won't be a very pleasant place to stay if the electricity is going to go out. which is a likelihood. 2,000 utility workers and we're talking about the maryland/dc area, baltimore areas, and states of emergencies in those areas as well. a lo
. >> larry, people are comparing this storm to last year's hurricane irene the tenth costliest in history. now from its command center today, home depot sending sump pumps, shop vacs anticipating lining irene a lot of coastal and inland flooding. for home depot that means demand for carpeting picks up after the storm. if there's any extra profit for the retail that comes out of this storm it comes from demand not pricing. home depot locked in prices this morning just to make sure that consumers will not get gouged. as for paying for the property, property and casualty insurers in good shape thanks to higher premiums and a lack of major events. a major storm may allow some of them to pass on higher prices to their clients. restaurants will see business decline. restaurants like this group you see here can take solace from the fact the storm is hitting did your the slow part of their week. as for the power provider the big exposure these four have in the mid-atlantic region where the heaviest rains and flooded is forecast. any earnings risk lies in prolonged outages in those areas. farther
for this outdoor reporting. >> been bringing us great updates. >> she dade great job too last year with irene. i think she was in north carolina. >> anyway, we'll check back in with kayla later this morning. let's also take a look at the markets. the futures are indicated higher after all the concerns that have been out there. the s&p futures up by more than 9.5 points. the dow futures are up by 65 points. not a lot of news stories that have been coming through. you've heard some earnings here and there. yesterday we had ford out early with better than expected numbers early. and there are a few other stories that have been out there, too. you guys see the ubs story? >> 10,000 jobs. >> 10,000 jobs this they were laying off. a lot of people found out when they showed up for work in london and their cards didn't work. other people found out because their e-mail kept bouncing back. that's the worst situation i've ever heard. it's not going to get nearly enough attention because of all the other things that are happening out there. >> did you see the other big merger yesterday? disney and "star wars
. >> that is true. what happened is we had a combination of hurricane irene and hurricane lee. that happened in 1955 with tremendous amounts of water build up. but in this case, it is the storm surge that did the dirty work because the way turned into the coast. again, i want to stress to people that heat and drought and hurricanes along the eastern seaboard are something we will have to deal with for the next several years because of the overall pattern. cooling pacific very warm and women. then we will be back to where we were in the 60s and 70s again. dagen: left hook of the storm, the ride home untransformed hitting us in new york city. if anything, on the jersey shore, that is different than hurricane irene when we saw it. >> that is exactly right. the hurricane is pushing a hand of water up through. in the 1938 hurricane, it doesn't bring a whole heck of a lot. from the storm passed to the left, it does. 15 feet of water in providence, rhode island. imagine that. 3800 of an inch of rain. less than connecticut, all through the delaware valley, tremendous flooding going on there. the same type o
of that was west of the coast, at least where i was we didn't get the rain we got with irene, not even close. >> right, we were most concerned about the flooding because of the tidal action. right there, yeah, the surge, we have wonderful beaches and between dewey beach and bethany beach we had to close route 1. there are a lot of others we had to close throughout the state. the bay communities were hit hard but we've got people out looking right now. we think we escaped the worst of it. >> and total cost for delaware, any idea yet in. >> we don't know. we have people as we say looking right now, i think it will take us a little while to figure that out. certainly concerned about the 44,000 families without power but we're obviously looking forward to utility crews getting out there as soon as, once conditions permit them to be out there. they can't be in harm's way if the winds are too high. >> for your state was this not as significant or not as negative of an outcome as irene, governor? >> well, i mean i'd put it this way we have a lot of flooding and we do have 40,000 plus people without
is on script. and that is that this afternoon's tide will be as bad as the perfect storm '92/irene of last year. and that tonight's tide, along with the entirety of long island sound on our side, could be catastrophic. that's what we're planning for. we hope it's avoided somehow and some way, but if you look at all the surge maps, it's connecticut that will be most adversely impacted. >> yeah. and you know what? i covered connecticut for quite some time many years ago. and there are neighborhoods on the coastline that get flooded during a thunderstorm. >> yeah. >> how are you going to keep homes from getting decimated up and down the connecticut coastline if. >> listen, we've ordered evacuations or suggested ev evacuations that affect 362,000 people, one out of every ten residents of the state of connecticut. but it's the small towns and it's the big cities. it's new haven, bridge fort, stamford, norwalk, fairfield, they're all going to be adversely impacted. we're waiting to see. if this hits 11 feet with waves on top of 11 feet, we're talking about dike systems being overrun. that's the sever
to last year's hurricane? >> the issue that the damage is more extensive than it was for irene. power. be a long time to at this point, i don't think it is a good estmaste. >> brian: your original estimate 7-10 days? >> that's right. that was too optmistic. >> steve: and any advice for people with a generator and watching this and wires down in the neighborhood? >> we'll be out patrolling and the public officials urge don't go outside and don't go near electric wires or downed wires. you don't know if it is a phone or cable wire you don't know if it is wrapped up in our wires down the line. >> brian: when something like this happens, is it worth calling to report or should we assume that everyone is down and we will get to you when we can. >> customers should report an out age and if it goes off report it afterwards. >> gretchen: a lot of people can do that on line as well. if they have computer service. >> brian: i another question for you . in terms of water receding, the worst is over and water is getting out of there, is that what you are seeing? >> brian: that's what we are see w
's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at bellevue hospital? >> yeah. i think that's the best way of
irene, goes by, the wind goes to the west even though it's strong to the west. it blows everything out. in this particular case, the wind keeps coming in from the southeast. >> yeah. all right. so the next thing i want to ask in terms of what -- for the people that didn't leave and heed the warning of governor cuomo in new york, governor kristchris kristi in new jersey, there a chance their homes could be below water. >> yeah. they could be below water for quite a while. what will happen is the tide tries to go out, and the wind will keep trying to stop the tietide from going out. it's a y dangerous situation. one of the things i got real upset with and i talked to you yesterday for quite a while about the whole situation is not putting the hurricane warning in effect because people think oh, it's a big nor'easter coming. big deal. we've gone through big nor'easters before. when the hurricane warning is put in effect because you have a hurricane coming, it's a very different story. my suggestion is once you've named that storm, you leave the name and the class fakings is important. >>
outages. they had hundreds of thousands of people without power during irene last year. they expect the same this year, probably even worse. they are thinking maybe as many as 600,000 without power for days to come. again the surge is really going to be problem here. we'll see that later in the evening and into tomorrow. matt? >> we spoke to connecticut's governor daniel malloy earlier this morning. he said this storm is one of the biggest threats to human life in his state in years. i began by asking governor malloy what worries him specifically about sandy. >> it's the next two tides. could experience tides this afternoon at about what the perfect storm was. tonight's tide during the nighttime hours could be twice that, and that's our biggest worry. if that happens it really is catastrophic. the amount of damage and loss of property is going to be extreme. we've been talking about it for days. we've prepared. we have people trying places. we have equipment in the right places. really we're waiting to see what mother nature throws at us. let's be clear. this storm is staying on scr
during hurricane irene last year, the county administrative building in upper marlboro had significant damage from flooding. so now they have these inflatable sand bags that they have ready to deploy if flooding becomes a problem. that's the latest here in forestville, back to you. >> thank you. >>> now we want to check in with julie wright. she's got a look at traffic. >> busy on the south side of town. traffic is congested and this is why, coming towards the wilson bridge on the inner loop, accident activity in the local lanes, slowing down to about 22 miles per hour headed in the direction of alexandria. northbound 210 at kirby road, delays beginning at palmer road. headed into southeast, heavy and slow because of a stalled car, inbound on the douglas bridge. watch for police direction to help direct you through. southbound 270, delays down to 31 miles per hour. gridlocked out of germantown at 16 miles per hour. and 35 miles per hour to wrap up your commute coming in from rockdale. that's a check of your fox 5 on- time traffic. >>> new this morning, a suspicious death investigation
and inland, once it gets inland, this is not just a coastal event and as you remember tropical storm irene caused more damage inland than it did along the coast. this system could dump up it a foot of snow, parts of west virginia, ohio on into pennsylvania. andrea, this one is going to be a massive, massive problem probably for days to come. >> all right, al. thank you. stay safe. dylan dryer will be here with the rest of the nation's forecast in just a few minutes. here's lester. >> all right. hurricane sandy is already impacting the race for the white house. mitt romney and vice president joe biden each canceled planned weekend appearances in virginia. ron mott is in ohio and he's traveling with vice presidential candidate paul ryan. ron, good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you. as we all know it takes 270 electoral votes to win the white house. 18 votes are up for grabs in ohio and they just may be the most important votes of all. >> hello, nevada! >> reporter: along with the weather churning over the atlantic, president obama and governor mitt romney are whipping up a storm of t
hurricanes will hit the northeast part of the united states. arguably, irene and sandy were not major hurricanes on the salve fir simpson scale. but if you look back at the 1950s a similar type of weather patterns produced tin major hurricanes up the eastern seaboard in a seven-year period including one, donna, gave hurricane-force winds everywhere from florida to maine. there is nothing new under the sun. you're seeing recycling what happened before except a lot of people don't know what happened before. a lot of that people say where is this coming from? basically go back and take a look at the maps. you will see where it came from. jenna: we forget quickly. tough to forget images we're seeing out of this storm. joe, nice to have you with us today. we appreciate the context very much. >> my pleasure. thank you for having me. jon: prayers for the victims it appeared survivors of superstorm sandy. pope benedict offering his condolences from the vatican expressing solidarity with all of the recovery crews. plus a new call for president obama to answer key questions about the deadly ter
irene. the strongest winds may be 100 to 150 miles north. southern jersey, delaware, maryland, the highest winds maybe up there in connecticut and new york city. it's a big, broad storm. that's the most important thing. and if you're north of that center, we have big issues and big concerns with storm surge and coastal flooding. that will probably be the epic ending to this storm. that's probably what everyone will remember is what happens to the beaches in new jersey, possibly connecticut, rhode island and long island if the storm does come ashore down there in southern jersey. all of these little lines are possible paths. we still haven't ruled out a direct impact into areas of new england either. there's still some questions to be answered. the bottom line is starting on sunday afternoon and evening, mid-atlantic and northeast, it's too late to prepare. you have today, you have tomorrow and then be prepared to stay in your house with your family and kids. most of monday and maybe even into tuesday. i'll have updates throughout the show here. stay tuned. new york city, sunri
million more than we had in irene. >> wow. >> so it is -- it is a completely devastating storm from that perspective. and i think what we're going to find, unfortunately, when we get to the jersey shore today is just total devastation. >> yeah. >> and that's the real concern. because not only is it people's homes and private property, but also you have the tourism industry in new jersey which is one of our biggest industries. we're going to have to work hard to make sure we're ready for next summer at the jersey shore. >> governor chris christie, our prayers are with the state of new jersey this morning. thank you very much. >> thank you, governor, good luck. >> mika, joe, mike, willie, thank you all you guys, appreciate it. >>> coming up in minutes, author of the best-selling book "the perfect storm" and "war," we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. on ga
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)